SIKKIMESE RAPPER PENS ANTHEM FOR THE PEOPLE’S MOVEMENT FOR GORKHALAND

June 25, 2017

 

 And the people are connecting to it big time!!!

Gangtok-born music producer and rapper, Ugen Nagyal Bhutia, has done it again. His 2015 hit ‘Call Me Indian’ turned heads with many of the music sites calling him the next gen rapper sensation. A string of hits under his hat, like the radio favorite ‘Badam Ko Lagi’, the loyalty song ‘Bhotey Kukur’ and now one of the largest streaming songs by a Sikkimese rapper, ‘Jai Jai Khukuri’.

Awash in music, Gorkha and Bhutia pride, he attempted to boost the morale of the community through the will of his conflicted rhymes.The rapper did not set out to create an anthem for protestors with his hopeful exploration of Gorkha pride, but it ended up being adopted by many who would write "Jai Jai Khukuri" while posting pictures of the movement as their caption. 

"It's a chant of hope and feeling," he told SummitTimes.

“I was in class 10 when I first heard about the Gorkhaland movement. I was not aware of the situation or what it meant to the people at the time so I was not that vocal about it. Seven years later, the movement began again and it garnered attention from everybody. This time I knew what it meant for the people of Darjeeling to have their own home,” Ugen shares.

In the video of the song, footage from past protests is interspersed with photos from Gorkhas’ 100-year movement. Since its official release on 19 June on Facebook and YouTube, the song has garnered more than 3.50 lakh online streams (excluding YouTube plays) with people calling it the ‘anthem’ of the movement.

“I wanted to be careful about what I wanted to express through the song. I did not want it to create a stir among the listeners therefore; I researched the topic and did some digging. I talked to people and wrote the song in about two days. I wanted to contribute something to the movement and I did with my music,” the rapper shares.

“The song carries the unbearable anguish of thousands. The song reflects the indifference, disregard and negligence of all who remain quiet about this issue,” Roshni Tamang from Darjeeling said when asked about the song.

On being asked about his timing to release the song, Ugen says, “This is what’s happening in the country. Whenever I make music, it reflects where I’m at mentally. And this is where we’re at”.

When asked about the response that the song has gotten since it got released, the Gangtokian says, “It’s crazy. This is one of my favorite songs that I have written and composed. To see that people are relating to the song makes me much more than just a musician. It makes them see me as one of them who is feeling the same thing.”

Check the video here:

 

 

 

 

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